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Discussion on Metal Fabrication Machinery including Q&A on maintenance and repairs. Plasma, Lock Formers, Brakes, ect.


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  #1  
Old 12-26-2019, 05:56 PM
Benttube Benttube is offline
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Default New old break any info would be great

Donít know much about this break and havenít found much searching. Figured I would turn to the experts. It is a Whitney Jensen that is pneumatically powered.

Any info would be great. Based on stamping with serial number it appears to be 4 ft 14 ga. Capacity.
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Old 12-26-2019, 05:58 PM
Benttube Benttube is offline
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Default Pics

Not sure how to get pics straight. If any one needs better pics let me know and I can text or email.
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Old 01-03-2020, 12:45 PM
tinnerjohn tinnerjohn is offline
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You might try contacting Roper-Whitney with the numbers on it. They might have manuals or other info depending how old it is. John
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Old 01-04-2020, 10:30 PM
MattM MattM is offline
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Looks like a scary piece of equipment to use. At least with an Autobrake you have pretty fine control of the clamping function. On that one I cannot imagine how it would function without the modern safety functions.
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Old 01-05-2020, 07:34 AM
tinnerjohn tinnerjohn is offline
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I was just able to blow the pics up better. Looks like that brake was built in 1941. Coming from Grumman really makes you wish it could talk! I didn't realize how old it was when I made my first post. My "Air Conditioning Special" 4 footer was built in 49, they didn't have any info on it, but its still worth an e-mail to Roper. John
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Old 01-05-2020, 11:46 AM
Benttube Benttube is offline
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It really is not scary at all. Depending on the speed adjustments (flow control valves) you can really slow it down.

I assume the 441 in the serial number is April 1941?
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Old 01-07-2020, 12:17 AM
MattM MattM is offline
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The serial production number perhaps. The mystery is the 89 part. Could be lot 89, which would suggest the design has been through a few production runs.

The 414 is for four feet wide up to 14 gauge. We had a 1014 Connecticut and it was a nice brake, although I'd never used beyond 16 gauge with it. 16 gauge on any manual brake is pretty physically intensive. I'm surprised even with the pneumatic contraption there is no counterweights attached. The counterweights take a lot of strain off moving the apron through the full range of motion.
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